Tag Archives: art

Klimt: Philosophy mural at University of Vienna

31 Oct

In 1894 Gustav Klimt was commissioned to do three paintings for the University of Vienna entitled PhilosophyMedicine and Jurisprudence.

This is the picture he presented for Philosophy:

 

Philosophy

 

 

“…Philosophy was, if anything, more disturbing than Medicine (check last post). Near the center an amorphous face emerged from the ether..was it God? Wisdom? To the side a column of naked, sinewy figures embraced and clutched their heads in despair or agony. And below them, nearly cut off at the bottom of the canvas, a clear-eyed, sinister woman stared directly at the viewer. Who was she? What did she represent?

The University professors were horrified. There was a meeting. Eighty-seven of them had signed a petition demanding that Philosophy not be hung in the Great Hall. They considered it an affront to reason and learning. The papers all carried accounts of the scandal, with various interpretations depending on their political slant. All of the critics weighed in, some very cruelly.

“I knew this would happen”, Klimt said. “The academics. They think art is like science, or should be. They want a nice equation, x plus y equals z. But its impossible. And even if it were possible, it wouldn’t be art.”

“Kraus said my paintings showed that I was ignorant of philosophy and that stupid people shouldn’t be allowed access to brushes and paint.”

excerpts from A Painted Kiss, by Elizabeth Hickey

 

Advertisements

Emphasizing Visual Thinking through Art in the Classroom

5 Aug

Visual arts are one way of enhancing visual thinking, the use of thinking by pictorial or visual images in your mind, as one can utilize the image to express oneself. This provides a natural and easy way of understanding and extending ideas, since the pictorial image becomes the extension of your thinking process.

Albert Einstein once said, “The words or the language as they are written and spoken do not seem to play any role in the mechanism of thought.”

Have you ever tried to solve a molecular or electrical problem by words alone? This is because we generally think visually and then convert to verbal forms later. The diagrams help form the idea in your mind first, then it becomes verbally reinforced. That is why visual thinking is the foundation of our thought.

There are three different kinds of imagery – seeing, drawing and imagining. These three work together in various ways to promote the thinking process. Seeing facilitates drawing and drawing invigorates seeing. Drawing stimulates and expresses the imagination and imagination heightens the material for drawing. Imagination directs and filters seeing, while seeing provides the material for imagination.

Drawing works in a similar way as imagination. Drawing is more than a recording of an event and more than an expression of one’s ideas. Drawing is a form of thinking, understanding and communicating. Drawing is seeing, seeing is an observational tool and when one draws something, it understands the object better.
Drawing helps you understand people’s feelings, since you begin to see people’s expressions, which show signs of the emotional state of the person. It brings vague inner images into focus and acts as the reflection of the visual mind.

When making a work of art, usually you draw it out and this process of drawing and thinking are frequently simultaneous that the drawn image appears almost as an extension of the mental process. Almost everybody can learn to see more fully, to imagine more productively and to express their visual ideas by drawing.

One of the primary ways that visual thinking is used in the classroom is in art class. Art is where visual thinking can thrive and actually does in the primary years, but once students get older, art loses is appeal for many. So its important to stress Art in the long term.
We’ll see why in the next step. Part 2.

Education through Art

3 Aug

Haliburton School of Arts

Truly edcuated men and women know that art is an essential part of education. Since modern men and women spend most of their time in a self-made enviornment, they are being educated through in and about art whether or not they realize it.
This is where the responsible educators will see to the provision of effective art programs that prepare students not only for their self-made environment, but also for the fullest enjoyment of that enviornment which is nature’s work.
The basic purposes of art education for my students is:
1. The development and coordination of the senses
2. The enrichment of the imagination
3. The development of the power to communicate
4. The acquisition of the means of transforming experience and being creative
5. The giving of order to the relationship between the emotional and intellectual parts of their nature
6. The preparation of students to be thoughtful and productive members of society, capable of making a contribution to the well being of their neighbour through the right uses of their talents.

Artist_Barnaby Barford_Porcelain with wings

21 Jul

http://www.barnabybarford.co.uk

For sure, fantasy doesn’t lack in Barnaby Barford’s work. The London artist famous for having stretched the canons of porcelain statues, has created ironic, subversive little sculptures, revolutionizing the classical subjects of a ceramic artist, reinterpreting them in a punk manner.
Check out the series Private Lives with the 1800’s family eating lunch at McDonald’s.

oh please can we keep it mummy?!’


‘shit! now I’m going to be really late!’
© barnaby barford, 2006
porcelain, miliput, enamel paint, painted wooden base

So much for traditional statues on your nice chest of drawers,

Darn I had a Big Mac and got eaten by a Pig who fought a Kung Fu monster who hit Mickey Mouse who was shot by the young shotgunner in a beautiful dress ready to be the Strongest Man in the World.

Got it!!!?? Get it!

Artist_Andrea Mastrovito

21 Jul

In and out of life


Andrea Mastrovito, a young artist from Bergamo, ironic, passionate about his work (of course!) and about the magic forests of butterflies…multicolour butterflies or black and white.

Colour is a firey lover. I move continually between its presence and its absence, like a poem by Dante.

Paintings that are mysterious, delicate paper collages, explosive site specific installations to get attention a historical places.

http://www.andreamastrovito.com/

Artist_Stephan Balkenhol

19 Jul

Stephan Balkenhol, Tre nudi femminili, 2006, legno di wawa dipinto, h 250 cm ca. Londra, collezione privata J.P.D. Geertman

Another wood artist that carves people out of blocks of wood: Stephan Balkenhol loves wood more than anything else. Women that hide in the trunk of a cedar tree, faces inlaid in a log.  His casual and undistinguished “guys and gals”, enigmatic and somewhat sad, are inspired by people he has photographed on the street.

Credit: Christine Jegan

 The artist makes these figures from soft wood (poplar or African wawa) cut with a power saw, hammer, and chisel creating rich surfaces where every mark of the chisel is visible. Calling to mind the great tradition of German figurative sculpture in wood and the expressionist heritage of the Germans, Balkenhol’s people are curiously devoid of emotion and have been described as “German Expressionism without the expressionism.”

I first saw Stephan Balkenhol’s work at the exhibition “Past Present Future”, a collection of work organized by the Unicredit Group Art Collection at Palazzo della Ragione in Verona 2010, with a giant man’s head in the center of the section “Face to Face”.

Testa maschile

Stephan claims: The people that I photograph on the street have no uneasiness. I show with irony the people of our times.”

What do you think about this German artist? Could you be one of his average people?

Artist_Jennifer Steinkamp

18 Jul

Sundance

Californian artist Jennifer Steinkamp, creates virtual trees as if they were in an earthly paradise…photographs/installations/video/multimedia art. Her works don’t have a story to tell, there is no beginning, no middle or end. Yet, through the images in movement, she can evoke stories. Just like a photograph and a painting can tell a story.

orbit

Jennifer’s (nice name!) trees, flowers, lights, urban landscapes are always moving because she likes the unsettled state of tension that the movement of air can give to us. Her trees are “possessed” by movement and that makes them almost alive.

By looking at her works, one experiences their own humanity. And maybe even is more attuned to how perceptions are strictly connected to emotions. Have a look….

 http://jsteinkamp.com/index.htm

 Sundance: :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bfjzJQvAP5Q&feature=related

Orbit: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73IGEwV1qYw&NR=1